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flordemaio

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  • "flordemaio" started this thread

Location: Brazil

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1

Thursday, April 21st 2011, 1:07pm

Surname Gullan/Gullann

I´m tracing my german roots and would like to know the meaning and origin of Gullan.Is it a German surname or Danish,since my ancestors came from Schleswig-Holstein (Rendsburg)? I found in the documents in the parish the surname spelled Gullan and Gullann.Thank you,my German friends.

2

Tuesday, April 26th 2011, 2:49pm

Hi,

Although it is difficult to give a definite answer without prior genealogical research, it is quite likely that your name is a germanized spelling of the Polish surname GULAN which is derived from gula = bumb, swelling. Millions of Germans have Polish ancestors.

CQ

Mahelene

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Tuesday, April 26th 2011, 7:01pm

Gullan

Hallo,





Last name: Gullane

Recorded in several spellings including Gullan, Gulland, Gullane, Gullam, Gullen, and probably others, this is apparently a surname of Scottish origins. It is locational from an old estate now called the village of Gullane in the parish of Dirleton, East Lothian. The famous author Robert Louis Stevenson referred to the village in his book Catriona, calling it "Gillan," whilst to add to the complication the local pronumciation is apparently "Goolan". The meaning is unclear, but probably owes something to the ancient 6th century word "gylde" meaning gold, and "land", which may have meant an island, although not necessarly one surrounded by water. The gold probably referred to wild marigold. Certainly like most surnames of locational origins, the first recording is at least nine centuries old. The first was probably William de Golin, whose seal appears on an early land charter of the abbey of Melrose in the year 1170, whilst William de Gulyne was a charter witness in the years 1212 - 1226. The spelling seems to have alternated bewteen Golin and Gulyne for several centuries Gulan, Gullan and the other forms, being first recorded from the 15th century.
© Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2011



Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Gullane#ixzz1KeKNkCFj



Best wishes

Mahelene

flordemaio

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Tuesday, April 26th 2011, 10:58pm

Gullan/Gullann

Dear German friends

Thank you very much for your sugestions. I can understand that the surname is definitely not of German origin.I´ve found persons in Danish census with this surname,spelled Gullann .

5

Wednesday, April 27th 2011, 4:24pm

Yes, indeed, this name seems to be of Danish origin. GULLAN must be a variant of GULLAND because both words are pronounced alike in Danish. Gulland is an old spelling of Gotland, an important island in the Baltic Sea during the Middle Ages which was under Danish sovereignty until 1645 (with the exception of short intervals) when it was ceded to Sweden.
Source (Scroll down to mid-page: Gulland

CQ
_________________________________________
Typo: not bumb but bump (in my first answer)

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Charles Quint" (Apr 29th 2011, 4:28pm)


flordemaio

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Sunday, May 1st 2011, 12:01am

Gullan/Gullann

I must say you are right.I´ve found my great-great-grandfather in a baptism in Warde -Jutland -Denmark.He is Heinrich Lorenz Gullann and sometimes his name is written Gulland.He came to Rendsburg in 1825 as Oberkriegkommissair.In some documents his name is von Gullann.Today iam happy because to find him was a very hard work.Thank you very much.