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basil100

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  • "basil100" started this thread

Location: Victoria, Australia

Societies: Wendish Heritage Society

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1

Sunday, December 1st 2013, 4:48am

Alternative Surname?

Hello fellow researchers
I am puzzled by several entries from the Evangelische duplicate church books for Werben (Kr Cottbus). A series of alternative surnames are given:
1. Lise Dahlitz oder Schwarzko is the unmarried mother of Christian Dahlitz (1825/36)
2. Anna Dahlitz oder Schwarzko and Hans Chuddi oder Koal are named as the parents in this record (1827/10). Martin Schwarzko of Werben is named as the first Godparent.
3. Christiane Schielka oder Schwarzko is the mother (no father listed) of Friedrich (1852/100). I think the record shows a Schwarzko as a Godparent but this is hard to read.
What do these alternative records mean? I have been told that these families are Wendish (Sorbian). Under what circumstances would these alternative names be used.
I will be very appreciative of some direction in this matter.
Barry Krueger
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2

Tuesday, December 3rd 2013, 1:26pm

Hello Barry,

I think, the alternatives do not depend on beeing Sorbian or not: sometimes these alternative names have been used, if a person was born before the marriage of his/her parents. But in this case it was not usual to continue this naming for more than one generation.

Other possibilities:
1. a long time ago there might have been a person whose mother took a new marriage after the dead of his father. If the relationship between the child and the new husband of the mother has been very good - or if the husband was very honorable - the child might have taken both surnames: of his own father and of the new husband of his mother.

2. the mother has been of a (relativly) famous or mighty familiy and took a husband of a less famous family. Then the sense of this doubled surname (in German language most times noticed als "anders genannt" or "alias") may have been used as a symbol for belonging to a famous family.

One example for the last: I know about a Family "Gundelach anders genannt Becker". The Gundelachs have been famous and mighty with their making glass (and with beeing leaders of a glassmakers-association during the 16. century). "Becker" has been nearly a no-name - and so the combination "Gundelach anders genannt Becker" or "Gundelach alias Becker" or "Gundelach-Becker" took part.

Most times these combinations are very old, which makes it hard to learn anything abourt their orign.

Greetings from Hannover

Giacomo
IRGENDWIE sind wir doch ALLE miteinander verwandt... ^^

3

Tuesday, December 3rd 2013, 10:43pm

To add one possibility more which has been in use until the end of the 19th century:

Sometimes families named themself after a house, an village or an aerea, which belonged to them and took this name as their first or second surename. If the house, village or aerea got its name from a familiy which had possessed it before, both of the names have been surenames.

Greetings again!
IRGENDWIE sind wir doch ALLE miteinander verwandt... ^^

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Sbriglione" (Dec 3rd 2013, 10:47pm)


basil100

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  • "basil100" started this thread

Location: Victoria, Australia

Societies: Wendish Heritage Society

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4

Wednesday, December 4th 2013, 11:59am

Thankyou. Yes, perhaps it is a Hofname or Hausname. I have another ancestor this time from the village of Cortnitz in Saxony - his marriage record from the late 18th century describes him as "Andreas Kleinig called Mieth" - perhaps the same thing
Thankyou
Barry